Design

  • Steal of the Week: Bundle Storm Bundles Loads of Bundles

    Don’t get bedazzled easily. Our headline, read word by word, might be a tongue breaker, yet tells nothing but the truth. In our Deal of the Week, the Bundle Storm, we have a massive resource with over 60 GB of material for you. As you may tell from the weight, this is not a small package. This is a bundle that bundles bundles (Oops, I did it again). As such it is one of the largest bundle bundles there has ever been. Thousands of high-quality elements for creative designers are waiting for you to be used in private and commercial projects alike.



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  • Building an Interactive Navigation Bar with HTML/CSS

    A straightforward navigation structure can increase the usability of your site, and make information easy to find. By using basic HTML and CSS, you can build a horizontal nav bar that provides interaction when a user hovers over a navigation link.



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  • Pedal to the Metal: Websites should Drive like a BMW, Not a Barbie Car

    What kid doesn’t lust after his or her own set of wheels? From an early age, kids want to get in the car and go – and for little girls, the ever-so-wonderful pink plastic Barbie car can provide hours of cul-de-sac circling and sidewalk cruising.



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  • 30+ Photo Manipulations That Make Your Jaw Fall Slack

    People with a passion for photography most likely have a passion for photo manipulation also. Professionals say: “You don’t just take a photo, you make it!” It is adventurous, experimental even, playing around with your photos and pushing the boundaries of the possible. Oftentimes these attempts fail miserably, there is a whole plethora of platforms with this kind of material – especially showing off bad filter effects… The following set of images is different. Some are plain beautiful, some really astounded me. See for yourself…



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  • HTML5 Datalist: What You Need To Know

    Autocompletion is a pattern that all web users are familiar with. When you do a search, your search engine suggests terms. When you type a new email message, your mail client suggest recipients. This functionality, however, has not been available to web developers without a nontrivial amount of JavaScript. One of the new HTML5 elements, the <datalist>, brings this autocomplete functionality to the Web natively. In this article, I’ll describe what datalists are, when it’s appropriate to use them, their limitations and what to do for browsers that don’t support them. Let’s get started.



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  • Tablet Web Design Best Practices: Free Ebook Offers Loads of Useful Tips

    Who would dare to not call the guys and girls of Canadian Mobify experts in mobile web design? They actually are. Though not everyone will find their cloud-based design concepts appealing. A short while ago the people at Mobify decided to publish an ebook on the best practices in tablet-focused web design. They titled the 25-pager "Tablet Web Design Best Practices: 30 Ways to Create Amazing Web Experiences on Tablets". Even more amazing, they give it away for free…



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  • Homepage Construction Kit: 40 Ready-made Elements for Web Design with Photoshop (+ how to create your own)

    It is quite common to prototype web designs in Adobe Photoshop. Although the final product will consist of large amounts of CSS driven looks, it usually turns out to be faster to use an image-editor for the first drafts. Photoshop still is designer’s first choice in many cases. Using very few basic shapes and forms you are able to creative high-grade user logins, buttons, sliders, video-players or even whole web sites.



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  • Create The Future: Common Techniques in Responsive Web Design

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    In this article, I’ll dive into some of the most common practices for building responsive site layouts and experiences. I’ll describe the emerging and available techniques for site layouts that flexibly resize based on screen real estate (referred to as “fluid grids”) so as to ensure that users get complete experiences across whatever screen size they are using. Additionally, I’ll show how to present rich media, especially images, and how developers can ensure that visitors on small-screen devices do not incur additional bandwidth costs for high-quality media.



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  • From 4-Inch Phones to 40-Inch TVs: Designing Responsive Websites

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    It’s worth taking a step back, to think through your site’s experience and understand whether the device with which a user accesses your site changes the user’s expectations of the site’s functionality. Is the user checking your site for quick updates with her cellphone while she’s on the go? Is he sitting down, 10 feet away from a large TV screen, looking to immerse himself in a relatively passive consumption experience of rich content, videos and games? Are other users sitting down at their PCs, looking to get the most from your site content? Most of all, how do these expectations affect the site layout and functionality that you provide at those corresponding screen sizes?



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  • Now Is The Time: Why the Web Is Ready for Responsive Web Design

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    Today, a large portion of site traffic comes from mobile devices — namely smart phones and tablets — in addition to traditional PCs. Across the globe, mobile devices now account for 12 percent of Internet traffic, and it’s scaling up faster than desktop Internet traffic. The fraction of mobile Web traffic is sufficiently higher in nations with high smartphone penetration (for example, 20 percent of US-based Web traffic is via mobile browsing). What’s more, this figure is expected to grow significantly over the next 10 years, as smartphones evolve and mature in terms of hardware and software and adoption picks up in South America, Asia and Africa.



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