CMS

WordPress or MODX? The Winner Is…

December 10th, 2012

WordPress and MODX are two of the most popular Content Management Systems. Each has its own loyal user base and audience, and both WP and MODX are amazing tools when it comes to website management. However, how do the two perform against each other? Alternatively, what are the similarities and dissimilarities between WP and MODX? We are going to answer these questions in the following article.

WordPress And MODX: A Comparison

Before going any further, allow me to clarify: I use both WP and MODX, and I find them great! I like the ease of use that WordPress brings to the table, and I appreciate the customization prowess that MODX offers. In this article, I will refrain from comparing mainstream features such as interface and layout. Why? Simply because if you have used WordPress for a long time, you will probably find MODX confusing. On the other hand, if you have been a loyal MODX user, you will not be able to operate WP with eyes closed either. I feel that this concept applies to every CMS (or any other software for that matter) out there.

Agreed, some CM systems are more user-friendly than others, but this very word ‘more’ is subjective. What I find user-friendly, may not feel the same to you, and vice-versa. I have been a Linux user for almost a decade now, and even though I have used Windows in the past and I’m not a stranger to it, I find the command lines and desktop environments in Linux to be easier to use as compared to the Windows Taskbar. Yet, I know that any Windows user will find the migration to Linux extraordinarily confusing, but that doesn’t stop me from feeling more at home with Linux as compared to Windows!

But I digress.

My point behind the above example of operating systems is simple: usability is a subjective concept, and if we are to compare two CMSs in a free and fair manner, we need to get rid of the usability rhetoric. That said, let’s focus on certain specific playing grounds and assess the performance of both WP and MODX.

Target Audience and User Base

WordPress began as a simple blogging tool. Even though right from its inception WordPress was being used for a wide array of websites, its primary purpose was to facilitate easier blogging. However, trends changed, and during the past few years, WP has evolved into a full-fledged CMS.

Yes, blogging still continues to be in the driver’s seat, and WordPress.com still proudly proclaims on its homepage: “Get A Free Blog Here!” However, WordPress, as a software, is no longer a bloggers’ monopoly, and if Matt Mullenweg’s statement at State of the Word 2012 is anything to go by, almost 66% of WordPress users use WP as a pure CMS, and not as a blogging tool. 

Still, all said and done, WordPress enjoys maximum usage amidst a particular section of users:

  • Portfolio purposes (artists, designers, photographers, etc)
  • Corporate/Business websites (you know, homepage with a big slider and 3 widgets and a separate blog page)
  • News/magazine websites (though most of the time, I feel WP shares this position with Drupal, Joomla!, Expression Engine and of course MODX)
  • Blogging (obviously)

While the above list is not absolute, it does provide us with a fair idea about WP’s primary user base.

MODX, on the other hand, has never once projected itself as a simple and nifty blogging tool. It was, and still is, a pure CMS that can cater to a wide range of users. It brings a lot of customization and tweaks to the table (we shall turn our attention toward this factor in the next sub-head), and in proper hands, MODX can power virtually any genre of websites, including blogs.

However, with that said, MODX does not find much love among the casual users: if you are looking to create a simple and nifty photoblog, in all likelihood, you will prefer WordPress over MODX. MODX surely has the ability to please everyone, but it is mainly employed by those who are looking for either great customization abilities or high-scale security, or both.

Administration and Security

This is where the difference between the two CMSs becomes manifest. WordPress has a structure that, if put to proper use, can let you do big things with your website. For instance, you can use custom post types and post formats to create a portfolio or corporate website. In fact, almost all the portfolio and business WP themes on ThemeForest have the same formulae beneath them: custom post types and post formats.

Such customization suffices for the intermediate to the novice level of users. Assume for a moment that you do not know much about coding. Now, purchase a portfolio WP theme and use it to create your online portfolio. Most likely, the theme will make use of a separate Portfolio post type to distinguish your portfolio items from main blog posts. Now, some days later, what if you decide to change the theme to a regular one? Once done, your portfolio post type will be gone! Of course, the handles and other details will still continue to exist in the database, but as a non-coder, you will be left without your portfolio items. Not a happy experience, is it?

This is where MODX establishes itself. As a casual user just wanting to create a gorgeous portfolio, you’ll probably find MODX to be overkill. But as someone wanting to do more with his/her website, you’ll love the control MODX offers you over your website. In MODX, your customization skills do not start with that of your theme or template — instead, you decide the way you’d like to do things!

When it comes to security, I often find almost half of the internet criticizing WordPress. I am, however, not in agreement with the criticism: yes, WP websites get hacked a lot, but that is, in my opinion, because WP is more popular than any other CMS. Since WordPress websites are easier to come across, they become handy targets for malicious minds. Poorly coded plugins and themes don’t prove much useful either. However, even if it isn’t WP’s fault per se, it all boils down to the practical fact: WordPress-powered websites are often targeted by hackers and crackers alike.

On the contrary, MODX projects itself as super-secure. It probably is, but there is a double-edged sword attached: considering the fact that MODX gives the customization ability to the user, the user himself needs to be pro-active. If your coding skills are limited, your MODX website will suffer.

Addons and Community

WordPress has WordCamp. MODX has MODXpo.

WordPress offers WordPress.com as well as VIP Hosting. MODX offers MODX Cloud.

But if you judge things at numerical value: WordPress has way more extensions and themes than MODX.

*Image Credit

In fact, even if MODX were as popular as WP, I don’t think the number of themes and addons would’ve risen. The reason is simple: MODX puts the power in your hands: you decide which editor you’ll use, and you get to decide the template. When it comes to MODX, the concept of a plugin repository becomes almost defunct.

The fact that WordPress powers a good number of casual users has led to many interesting concepts, the latest being the rise of Managed WP Hosting. Hosting firms such as WP Engine and ZippyKid have come up, which offer specialized WP hosting, along with security and updates. Since the user base of MODX has little to no casual or novice users, such innovations are rare. On the other hand, MODX “learning resources” such as books and documentation are a class in themselves.

Conclusion

And now, let’s sum it all up!

WordPress

Pros

  • Detailed abstraction with almost no need of further tweaking if you’re a casual user.
  • Ideal for blogs and even medium-sized news websites.
  • Less work to do: numerous ready-made themes and plugins.

Cons

  • Too many plugins = a bloated back-end.
  • Security woes.
  • Advanced users: Abstraction may leave you feeling handcuffed.

MODX

Pros

  • Great scope for customization.
  • Ideal for medium- to large-scale websites.
  • Less security issues.

Cons

  • Loads of work in customization: not ideal for casual users.
  • Fewer third-party goodies.
  • Little help beyond the official docs and forums (not many third-party blogs and magazines).

Which CMS do you prefer? WordPress or MODX? Have your say in the comments!

(dpe)

Sufyan bin Uzayr writes for various magazine and blogs, and has authored several books. He is the guy behind Code Carbon. You can learn more about him or friend him on Facebook.

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Tom
Guest
Tom
3 years 7 months ago
MODx is still really for developers with design skills. People with no development skills can readily learn and use WP. This is not true for MODx because many addons require “developer-level” knowledge and skill (try MIGx and see for yoursefl) and because despite recent efforts, documentation remains uneven, particularly for addons per se. Lastly, many addons are incomplete — for example, MODx does not yet have a working usable e-commerce addon because e-commerce is just soooooo hard to do properly and securely. Oh, did I mention that user security is way harder in MODx?? This is an acknowledged fault of… Read more »
Eliot Jones
Guest
Eliot Jones
3 years 3 months ago

MODx + FoxyCart = e-commerce made easy. I have it running on two Evo builds and the setup was less that an hour.

Tim
Guest
Tim
3 years 7 months ago

Concrete5 FTW!

Tazz M
Guest
Tazz M
3 years 7 months ago

I am a huge fan of WordPress, and I see a lot of comparison with Joomla, Drupal, Expression Engine, etc, but never heard of MODx mentioned before. So is this a infomercial?

Dieter Petereit
Noupe Team
3 years 7 months ago

Infomercial for a free CMS? To answer the question: No, it’s not.

Sufyan
Guest
3 years 7 months ago

Hi,
Hah…no, this is not a infomercial.
Agreed, WP is popular, and so are Drupal and Joomla! But MODX is a renowned CMS in its own right. :-)

buzz
Guest
buzz
3 years 7 months ago

+1 had the same feeling about that article …and I’m using both systems. *astroturf*

Jay Gilmore
Guest
3 years 7 months ago
Bias alert (MODX Staff) Very good compare and contrast of WordPress and MODX. As you have highlighted, MODX is designed to give those who want complete control and flexibility over design and implementation. This currently comes at a price in that you need to be a skilled web worker to build and implement. This includes front end developers, intermediate and higher site builders and programmers. I’d disagree with Tom on the skill level needed to start with MODX as my background is as a Front End Dev with very rudimentary PHP skills (which is typical of most web developers); However,… Read more »
Sufyan bin Uzayr
Guest
3 years 7 months ago

Hey,
Glad you liked the article. :-)
I agree, WP plugin repo is full of many plugins that perform just one basic function. Plus, there are many plugins that have by now become useless because WP itself offers the same functionality. Luckily, MODX (and even Concrete5 for that matter) doesn’t suffer from this. However, in a practical world, there are many users who’d really want to quickly install a plugin instead of digging the code, and this is where WP helps them.

Jacopo Tarantino
Guest
3 years 7 months ago
I think the views that WordPress is insecure are outdated. It used to have a number of security vulnerabilities that it just doesn’t have anymore because the developers found them and squashed them. Today, any given new WP install should be perfectly secure from the get-go. Also, I think you’re understating how incredibly unfriendly Modx is. I had to use it for a client once and had a terrible time. The menus are difficult to navigate and the page management structure is slow and awkward to use. And somewhat more of a statement: I think that managed hosting is very… Read more »
Sufyan bin Uzayr
Guest
3 years 7 months ago

Hey,
MODX is “incredibly unfriendly”? Not sure about that. You’re mentioning that WP isn’t insecure anymore owing to updates, but overlooking the fact that MODX isn’t unfriendly to users anymore owing to updates. I personally feel that MODX has one of the best management structures, though I do agree, it can confuse a WP user a little bit. But the inverse is also true: a MODX user will find WP confusing as well.

Jacopo Tarantino
Guest
3 years 7 months ago

I actually used ModX before WordPress and still didn’t like it. Does it still separate “snippets” and “chunks”? I never understood the difference…

Aaron Brewer
Guest
3 years 13 days ago

To your latest comment. The difference between Chunks and Snippets is pretty clear from the get-go. Chunks act as HTML includes and Snippets act as PHP includes. Chunks cannot process PHP code, Snippets can. I don’t really think it’s that hard to comprehend.

Paul
Guest
3 years 7 months ago
I’ve never heard of Modx before reading this. I would of thought a comparison between WordPress and Drupal would of been a better comparison. Saying that I can see that this is an article written with a bit of bias to Modx and by someone how doesn’t really understand the improvements to WordPress. I don’t understand how too many plugins can be a con for WordPress. This is the power of the community. The problem is not the amount of plugins it’s the amount of poorly developed plugins in the repository which they are currently working through to improve the… Read more »
Jez
Guest
Jez
3 years 7 months ago

“I’ve never heard of Modx before reading this”

… guess that’s the point for this article

Sufyan bin Uzayr
Guest
3 years 7 months ago
Hi, Umm….MODX is probably not as popular as WP or Drupal, but it is a wonderful piece of software in its own right. However, I’m not commenting to defend MODX. I’ll just justify my stand: 1. “comparison between WP and Drupal”: Yes, agreed. In fact, I already did one sometime back, for a separate publication: http://www.linuxforu.com/2012/05/winner-takes-all-wordpress-vs-drupal-vs-joomla/ 2. “someone who doesn’t really understand the improvements to WP”: Ehm…not sure about that. If you do read the above link, you’ll notice that I placed WordPress over Drupal in most aspects. I do like WP, in fact, most of my websites run WordPress;… Read more »
Aaron Brewer
Guest
3 years 13 days ago
The plugin problem is not good. There is a plugin for everything. When I look at a WordPress powered website, I see bloated, messy, non standard, crap code everywhere. While plugins are good for someone that doesn’t know a thing about website development and or how important the code is, it is terrible for people that like to have clean, understandable, and clear code. Plugins are killing WordPress rather than making it better. I have used MODx for the past two years and have tried to play more and more with WordPress, but I can only really see WordPress being… Read more »
raul
Guest
2 years 11 months ago

yes but wordpress not have a faceted search without plugins, wordpress is based y posts dated system.
Yes you have millions of visitors per day in a clustered network of computers and using cache plugins for wordpress like w3 total cache. You really need a custom config and modding plugins, themes and core files too, for speed, seo, clean html and much more

JP DeVries
Guest
3 years 7 months ago

I tend to go by the if WordPress + Plugins do about 93% of what you need to do, and absolute control over the structure of the content and accuracy of the markup isn’t critical go with WordPress. The things it does it does very well.
I often find myself needing something that gives me for creative freedom in yes content and markup of sites but actually even more so how the are optimized and cache.

Marcelliru
Guest
Marcelliru
3 years 7 months ago
I have explained in a comment to a former post of yours, Sufyan, why I think that MODX is the right solution in comparison to WP if you’re doing any site that is not a simple blog with a simple css/html template found on the internet. If you’re doing any kind of site of your own, irrespective of its site (it may be a small personal blog – but your blog), then go with MODX! I am a non-developer, non-coder, non-web-professional. I know rudiments of css and html. I run a WP site and am fond of WP’s publishing features:… Read more »
Sufyan bin Uzayr
Guest
3 years 7 months ago
Hi, I feel that if you want proper control over your website, MODX is a better tool than WP. I use WP on my personal blog and a news mag that I run. Why? cuz WP is ideal for quick publishing, when all you need to do is share an article, attach a featured image, probably upload a video or two, and that’s it. No hassles. Quick and easy. But for any project of mine that I’m *really* serious about, such as heavy customization , including one that I’m currently working on, I opt for anything except WP: generally MODX,… Read more »
David Radovanovic
Guest
3 years 7 months ago

You may have already noticed that Noupe is written with WordPress.

Sufyan bin Uzayr
Guest
3 years 7 months ago

Hey,
LOL…yes it is. But if that is to be a criterion, I guess Drupal is the most *politically correct* CMS in USA? Ref: website of White House. ;-)

Susan Ottwell
Guest
3 years 7 months ago
Uneducated, self-taught half-blind grandmother’s input here…I will first freely admit that I’ve been a freelance web developer using MODx for eight years now. Yes, I have from time to time tried other systems. I’d like to make a couple of points in response to some of what I’ve seen here. 1. MODx Cloud is a managed MODx hosting system. One example of its benefits? I have one “production” and three “development” sites at the moment. There was a new version of MODx the other day. A few mouse clicks to open the site toolbars and click “Upgrade” and they were… Read more »
Ryan Hellyer
Guest
3 years 7 months ago
Thanks for the excellent writeup. These types of articles usually end up being horridly biased or based on all sorts of strange misconceptions. I think much of what you wrote could also be said of Drupal and other larger scale CMS’s when compared with WordPress. There are movements afoot to allow for heavier customisation within WordPress and there are tools available to improve this right now such as the Posts 2 Posts plugin. Another major criticism I would level at WordPress is performance and out-dated legacy code. In it’s pursuit of backwards compatibility and stability, WordPress has amounted a sizeable… Read more »
Mark Rowatt Anderson
Guest
3 years 7 months ago
Thanks for the article. I too had not heard of MODx and will add it to my list of possible tools for future projects. A couple of misrepresentations on WordPress, though. (1) “Too many plugins = a bloated back-end” – this simply isn’t true. A hundred focused, well written plugins may be just fine, or one poorly written plugin could bring your site to a crawl. There is very little overhead in activating a plugin, it’s what the plugins do which may or may not add bloat. (2) “Most likely, the theme will make use of a separate Portfolio post… Read more »
Sufyan bin Uzayr
Guest
3 years 7 months ago

Hi,
1. “hundred focused plugins…”: Agreed, but I’ll also add that sadly, hundred focused and well-coded plugins are nowadays pretty hard to find.
2. “custom post types..”: Correct, should be implemented as a plugin, but look up ThemForest. 99.9% of themes implement custom post types to distinguish your portfolio from your blog. Use the theme and all’s fine. Change the theme and silently weep.

Michael McGlynn
Guest
3 years 7 months ago

The key different is this. If I want to make a customization to a template in WordPress, I have to open code in an editor. With MODx, I can do it in the browser. Simple difference that saves huge amounts of time when your are iterating a design.

WP- hate the plugin ghetto
WODx – documentation is horrible. Try building a gallery and see for yourself.

Sufyan bin Uzayr
Guest
3 years 7 months ago

“WP plugin ghetto”: haha…I laughed at that one. :-)

Michael McGlynn
Guest
3 years 7 months ago

Sufyan, you gotta expand the paragraph breaks in your comments. Without spaces between the paragraphs, comments are too hard to read and scan.

Peter B.
Guest
Peter B.
3 years 7 months ago
Eventually WP users want to extend their WP sites and they wind up hacking – WP’s term, not mine – their Theme files to get it to do what they think they want it to do. Of course, there’s no going back to the way things were. I hate, absolutely freaking HATE WP with my entire soul because EVERY.SINGLE.TIME someone asks me to help out with their WP install “Fuck you Jason Coward and MODX for being so damn brilliant!!!” automagically escapes my lips. That’s because, invariably, what I’m asked to do in WP will take me oh, 15 minutes… Read more »
Peter B.
Guest
Peter B.
3 years 7 months ago

In other, shorter sentences:
WP makes you do things its way.
MODX allows you to do things your way.
It is limited by your imagination.
Hence the MODX slogan: Creative Freedom.

Dave
Guest
3 years 7 months ago
I have used both systems for loads of jobs, and have written brief articles comparing them. The articles are somewhat dated, because I’ve gone almost exclusively to WordPress now, partly because of not being able to get enough work with MODx. I didn’t care for the interface of MODx 2 very much. I’ve also just always had more fun using WP. Also the community for WP is gigantic and constantly growing, and MODx’s community is much smaller and slower growing. There are also loads more excellent WP premium themes, frameworks, plugins, and other tools that I can get support for.… Read more »
Kris
Guest
3 years 7 months ago
I’ve been using MODX exclusively for my CMS for over 6 years now. I think I could get more work if I knew WP (and I’m tempted to learn it for that reason alone), but man, the level of ease of customization in MODX is so freaking awesome. I’ve taken so many sites and quickly built them into MODX and the level of control you can offer to your clients is really amazing. I know very little PHP and my strength is in front end development. MODX allows me to build whatever I want based on how I want to… Read more »
Ben
Guest
3 years 7 months ago
Great article thanks for that, just one thing. You noted that a Con of WordPress was too many plugins, and a con for MODX is not enough third party goodies. Surely the fact WordPress has a burgeoning community of developers offering plugins both free and commercial is a massive boost for WordPress? I have used MODX I quite liked it personally, I do not wish to get into an argument or some kind of flame war over the two which is better etc. (which you have skillfully avoided doing BTW). I do not agree that WP has a bloated back… Read more »
Sufyan
Guest
3 years 7 months ago
Hi. Let me clarify. 1. Con of WP is not too-many-plugins, but instead, too-many-bad/crappy-plugins. Agreed, there are many good ones out there, but for each good plugin, there are 10 poorly coded ones. 2. MODX: Not enough third-party stuff: yes, in COMPARISON to WP, that is. MODX doesn’t have ThemeZilla coding stuff for it, for eg. :) 3. WP does not have a bloated back-end. Not by virtue of its own. But add multiple plugins, and the performance goes down. Add 3-4 plugins, and you’re stuck with a bloat. My opinion/experience. 4. “WordPress has an excellent array of features”: Oh… Read more »
Nathan
Guest
3 years 7 months ago

I persisted with Modx for many years thinking it was the developers dream and had always turned my nose up to WordPress. In the end though I wanted to make money, and ModX was wasting too much of my time. WordPress is just so polished these days, easy to setup and demand from clients and other dev companies is high. Support resources are 100 times more available. E-commerce solution with support. WordPress absolutely smashes ModX.

Rafique
Guest
Rafique
3 years 7 months ago
Hi, Nice comparison between two nice web building tools, (though it’s my first day of installing MODx on my system, but first look gave me a nice impression to try it). I am a fighting (poor in quality) theme developer of WP, recently started Drupal today I got MODx. In my opinion, WP is not super handy as a CMS, there’s a ton of hassle to make it CMS like (not pure though) as Drupal offers. But MODx seems to be more handy at both Theming and making it customizable. When templating is so easy, it must going to be… Read more »
Mitch
Guest
Mitch
3 years 6 months ago
I used MODx 2 years ago and it caused me the greatest server pain I ever experienced with any CMS. To be true, I still try to wrap my head around that such things can even be possible, but with MODx they seem to. I always compare anything with the attached support. MODx has a bunch of arrogant forum core members that, should you really get stuck, can make you feel like, really bad. WP? Even the dumbest appearing questions get attention. No discrimination like in the MODx forum. Too many add-ons at WP and too many crappy one? Yes.… Read more »
Michael Snow
Guest
Michael Snow
2 years 9 months ago
I have to say, I have had nothing but postive experiences with the MODX forums. After reading many, many threads, I have seen some of what you’re referring to, but it is extremely infrequent. I continually get great responses, suggestions, and clarifications about how to do all kinds of things by posting in the MODX forums. As for servers, one DOES have to be careful about selecting a hosting service that has all the right software and hardware to run MODX Revolution properly. You can’t just slap a Revolution site on any $2/mo hosting service and expect it to run… Read more »
Stu
Guest
Stu
3 years 5 months ago
I’ve used WordPress, Joomla, Drupal and Modx – I can see why Modx appeals to designer types but Modx tests my patience every time I have to work with the damn thing. Ever tried moving Modx from one server to another, like dev to staging to live – good luck. ModX puts its cache files in core – seriously!!! And then regularly refuses to clear them when you use the clear cache function. Oh and because of the way it caches things your PHP debugging becomes much harder as the PHP file that runs isn’t the one you wrote so… Read more »
MTbinary
Guest
3 years 5 months ago
I’ve been using Modx for at least 6 years now. You’d have to pry it from my cold dead hands. Modx has always complemented my projects as I most often find clients that want tools that go beyond the plugins you find in WP and Drupal. Rather than hack away at the CMS core, using Modx to build custom sites is quite elegant. It is way more stable than using a myriad of WP plugins and hoping the accompanying JS doesn’t cancel each other out. For the guy above that doesn’t understand the difference between chunks and snippets? …stick with… Read more »
nisa
Guest
3 years 5 months ago

i choose wordpress, i think if every platforms have their vulnerability, but inform of open source, it will develops by itself

Abu Monsur
Guest
3 years 5 months ago

Some says MODX and most say wordrpess.I had better go with wordpress as I don’t have enough tech. skill.
A question to the experts-what skills do I need to continue with MODX?Thank you

Earl Gardner
Guest
3 years 5 months ago
The fact that, as you say, WordPress is commonly attacked by hackers, makes MODx our choice of CMS platform. In the same way PC’s are attacked more than Macs, because of the popularity of PC’s means they aren’t as safe to use as Macs unless you secure them. WordPress sites can also be secured, but most people don’t and that is why WordPress sites are such a big problem when it comes to hacking. I do agree that MODx isn’t for the beginner though, and does require a lot more skill to set up than a WordPress does, which can… Read more »
Howie
Guest
Howie
3 years 4 months ago
I use Modx Revo for lower budget websites and ExpressionEngine for bigger budegts. I love Modx but the only drawbacks are slack slack slack documentation…why put so much work into an Extra and document it so poorly. Come on Modx wake up. WordPress just breaks my heart when I really need to customise. I actually built a large golfcourse website with Modx and Babel worked well for multi languange aspects . I also like being able to duplicate contexts and duplicate the navigation tree. It has many advantages navigation wise over ExpressionEngine. All said once u get used to Modx… Read more »
Glidias
Guest
Glidias
3 years 3 months ago
One of the things about ModX is that it’s over-reliance on inline Snippet tags to generate content using a tag based structure and manually typed parameters, leaving a snippet prone to typo errors (eg. typing parameters wrongly). This is because Snippets are convenient to create, and many addon developers rely on these a lot. Why not have metatagged/commented variables in a Snippet with some information on the variable type and possible values, allowing a standard ModX GUI to be hooked into every snippet? That way, a GUI could easily be plugged into the snippet system, allowing more user friendly drag-and-drop… Read more »
Mr Linn
Guest
Mr Linn
3 years 3 months ago

I like Modx , because it so easy to use for me. Creative freedom , and you can create your own style website. If you like some gallery or some plugins script, You can easily change the snippets in modx . It is so useful for me.

Philippe
Guest
Philippe
3 years 3 months ago
Of recently, I have started using WordPress. This is the only CMS/blogging software I have been using, and can therefore not judge whether MODx is better or worse than WordPress. The things that have made me choose WordPress are quite simple: number of downloads, bigger than any other CMS! Does it mean that it is better than any other CMS, from a technical viewpoint? Most probably not. Look at Windows: most widely used OS for PC’s, laptops,… Does it make it the best OS? Hell, no! Between the GPF’s that plagued the early versions, the dreaded “Blue Screen of Death”… Read more »
Gru
Guest
Gru
3 years 2 months ago
I have been with MODX for about 2 years now, used it to set up 3 private projects and one forum solution (integrated into one site with Discuss). I also have minor experience with Joomla, and I was extremely disappointed with it as I was struck by a bug in Joom!fish that caused me to return backup for a client. I also had minor experience with WordPress, tho I assume it has gotten more slick and powerful in the last two years. MODX is a great CMS for my purposes (not a web designer but I can code), has a… Read more »
Yami
Guest
Yami
3 years 2 months ago
I used both but WordPress is more user friendly and also developer friendly too. I’m fun of WordPress development due it’s less required modification and just follow the instructions also it’s update is just a click a head unlike ModX currently suffering from getting the related products features because the older version is not compatible on the new version and it has a lot of config to do with more settings that some are not easy to understand. I made lot of WP Plugins and integration unlike with ModX you must read lots of documentations and less forums to assists.… Read more »
1GR3
Guest
3 years 2 months ago

few weeks ago I have decided I won’t start a new WP project ever and as an alternative I chose MODx. It took me some time to get used to it but know I really enjoy development and can’t believe the speed of progress is made. I must say I’m graphic designer first, coder second and I’m learning PHP along developing my first MODx site so I encourage everyone who haven’t tried it yet.

Legues
Guest
Legues
2 years 11 months ago

Me too! It´s flexible and it´s what you develop is what you get!!! No pre-defined templates!!! Modx means freedom in terms of some of the most common CMS! I just recommend this CMS over WordPress!!!

janice
Guest
3 years 1 month ago
Wow this is turning out to be a popular post. Well i’m no developer, i don’t know PHP or Javascript but I’m a proficient HTML/CSS coder and i’ve been using MODx for about 5 years. I agree it has a steep learning curve but once the fundamentals and terminology are grasped it really is a great platform for designers and front-end developers…and nothing to be scared of. I’ve used WordPress and in fact wrote a blog post about a recent project I undertook using a pre-made theme (http://9thwave.co.uk/blog/2013/05/21/wordpress-website-experience-working-with-templates/). It is very good for an out-of-the-box solution but it always feels… Read more »
Legues
Guest
Legues
2 years 11 months ago

I totally agree!! I guess we just have to have the patience to understand the basics, the the things start beeing so obvious!!! I just use MODX in my projects!!! I don´t need more than that because i don´t believe that exist a CMS like this one!!!

Mangesh Yadav
Guest
3 years 1 month ago

WordPress is a blogging tool. You can also make it work like a CMS. Tons of plugins.

MODx: Its a clean slate. Total creative freedom. Top 10 ad-dons is all you need to get what you want. Someone who have used MODx would really understand what “Creative freedom” is.

I have developed 1000+ websites for 12 years using Joomla and WordPress.

MODx is the NEXT BIG THING.

Sam
Guest
3 years 19 days ago

Thank You for the good article!I like how you have taken the ‘user’ personal preferences out as much as possible.

I found this article as in the near future I will be required to create an involved website which has been requested to be built in WP. Creativepact has used MODX for most of our CMS sites for the past few years and to be honest I would prefer MODX for this site. Ie would require a solid arguement to change their mind.

Thanks Again!

Warren Portsmouth
Guest
2 years 11 months ago
Just installed MODx 3 days ago and set it up to handle multiple domains. Have 1 domain all done (thenannyconsultants.com) and in progress on doing the layout and blog for my main domain. I agree the documentation is not the best but a little thought and testing breaks through. I am not an experienced web designer. I went to MODx because I couldn’t make thenannyconsultants site wotk on WordPress and Concrete 5 was just too hard for me. On MODx I set up multi domains and ported the html site with complex wayfinder and UltimateParent menus set up and debugged… Read more »
Thijs Van Damme
Guest
2 years 10 months ago
WordPress vs Modx, try to perform the simple task of generating a compliant menu without any added bloat html for example. In WordPress you need to change the atributes in the call, but where is the call, in the header.php, nope…. in the sidebar.php aha, then add a custom walker to you functions.php , you will pull your hair out if you want to create something simple. Only to find out that you actually broke the theme and that your widgets are no longer working… pfff In Modx, menu you say no problem, place your call, follow this template or… Read more »
Tony Porto
Guest
2 years 10 months ago

I have used both extensively and clearly say Modx all the way..

Cloughy
Guest
2 years 10 months ago

MODx is just so good ! Just try it. It deserve to be much more popular :)

Daniel Miguel de Melo
Guest
2 years 10 months ago

MODX for the win!

The best CMS ever!

Gavin Baylis
Guest
2 years 10 months ago
Good article, I’ve been using MODX for the past 5 years – think when I was making the move to a CMS I looked at WP, Joomla and WP and came across MODX. At first it was so frustrating, would seem that all the documentation was around 90% with the critical 10% that you needed to complete the job not there, or written in such a way that you had to be extremely technical to work it out. In fact I think on the forums it’s almost an unwritten rule to give a complete answer / solution to the Original… Read more »
Halfnium
Guest
Halfnium
2 years 5 months ago
Five years ago, I built my first-ever site of about ten pages. Its use of server-side scripting was minor, limited to PHP include() calls for navigation. Even at that, I understood that there had to be a better way to go. One rainy weekend’s Googling lead me to MODX. It was a steep but worthwhile learning curve. I’ve done a site that now contains 2000+ pieces of content. I can’t imagine doing a site of more than five pages without it. Pay heed to Gavin Bayliss’s post of 2013-09-28. He slipped something by that is subtle but powerful: MODX’s “site… Read more »
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